Hunting in Spain

 

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Introduction

Spain is a country and member state of the European Union located in southwestern Europe on the Iberian Peninsula. Its mainland is bordered to the south and east by the Mediterranean Sea except for a small land boundary with the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar; to the north by France, Andorra, and the Bay of Biscay; and to the northwest and west by the Atlantic Ocean and Portugal. Travelling here is easy, accommodation plentiful, the climate is mild and the people relaxed, the beaches long and sandy, the food and drink easy to come by and full of regional variety. More than 50 million foreigners a year visit Spain, yet you can also travel for days and hear nothing but Spanish.

Geographically, Spain’s diversity is immense. There are endless tracts of wild and crinkled sierra to explore, as well as some spectacularly rugged stretches of coast between the beaches. Culturally, the country is littered with superb old buildings, from Roman aqueducts and Islamic palaces to Gothic cathedrals. Almost every second village has a medieval castle. Spain has been the home of some of the world’s great artists: El Greco, Velazquez, Goya, Dali, Picasso – and has museums and galleries to match. The country vibrates with music of every kind – from the drama of Flamenco to the melancholy lyricism of the Celtic music and gaitas (bagpipes) of the northwest.

This is great chance to bring you family with you and enjoy both hunting and Spanish culture. Come and bag your magnificent Red Deer, Fallow Deer, Roe deer, Mouflon, 4 species of Ibex and Chamois here. Traditional “Monteria”, the royal hunting, is also available in Spain. US and Canada citizens do not need a visa to hunt in Spain.

Hunting season


Red Deer, Fallow Deer: August 15 – February 15
Mouflon sheep, Wild Boar, Spanish Ibex: All year round
Cantabrian Chamois, Pyrenean Chamois: August 15 – November
Roe Deer: May 1 – September 13

Trophy

Red Deer

Red Deer

Iberian Red Deer is a smaller race, with stags weighing 180-220 pounds (82-100 kg). Compared to European Red Deer, the coat is not as thick and is somewhat lighter in color. Antlers are not as long or heavy, but are still very fine, sometimes with as many as 18-20 points (or even more) and a high incidence of crowning. Spain is estimated to have 350 000 Red Deers. Opportunities for good trophies are especially good during the rut or “roar” in the second half of September.

Fallow Deer

Fallow Deer

Shoulder height 36-43 inches (91-109 cm). Weight 140-220 pounds (64-100 kg), sometimes more. Females are smaller. Medium-sized, with more color variations than any other Deer. Antlers have brow and trez tines (bez tines are usually absent), and are well-palmated at the top, with a number of tines coming off the rear edge of the palmation. Diurnal, with most activity early and late in the day. Vision, hearing and sense of smell are good. When alarmed, gives a short “bark” and runs off with stiff-legged bounces that serve as a warning.

Mouflon

Mouflon

Shoulder height 26-30 inches (66-76 cm). Weight 70-100 pounds (32-45 kg). European Mouflon is one of the world’s smallest wild sheep, resembling a slim domestic sheep except that it has a normal coat of hair, any wool being concealed beneath. Upper parts are reddish-brown with a pale (almost white) saddle patch in the winter coat. Underparts, rump, lower legs and muzzle are white. There is dark neck ruff but no bib. The horns usually grow in a tight circle, with the tips turned inward toward the face and broomed back to about a three-quarter curl. Females sometimes grow small horns, but usually do not. Gregarious. Females with young form year-round flocks; mature males have separate flocks. The purebred mouflon, especially an old male with large horns, is a fine game animal that is difficult to hunt. It is the only sheep that is mainly nocturnal and lives in thick cover.

Wild Boar

Wild Boar

Shoulder height 30-47 inches (76-119 cm). Weight 150-400 pounds (68-181 kg), sometimes as much as 700 pounds (317 kg). Females are somewhat smaller than males and have much smaller tusks. A medium-sized animal with a thick body, relatively thin legs, a short neck, and a long, pointed head ending in a disklike snout. Coat is dense, bristly hair, brownish-gray in color, sometimes with cheek whiskers and a neck mane. There are no facial warts. Each foot has four toes, the middle two supporting the body, the two lateral toes (false hoofs) higher up and not touching. Canine teeth are usually well-developed, forming tusks. Upper tusks grow outward and backward; the lower ones grow upward and backward, tending to make a circle. Tusks will usually wear against each other, honing sharp edges. Gregarious, living in family groups, though old Boars may be solitary. Wary and alert. A fast runner and strong swimmer. Its habitat is undergrowth and forest, at any altitude. Requires water for drinking and wallowing.

Beceite Ibex

Beceite Ibex

Beceite Ibex is one of three categories established for record-keeping purposes by splitting Mediterranean Ibex (subspecies hispanica) into geographical groups based on horn size and shape. The other two are southeastern Spanish Ibex and Ronda Ibex. This is the largest and darkest type with the largest horns. Typically, the horns are straighter than in Gredos Ibex and have a spiral turn of less than 180 degrees. Horn thickness remains constant for half the length, then decreases toward the tip, which is not as thin as in the Gredos race. While this is the typical Beceite horn conformation, other horn shapes may be found in this region and even in the same herd.

Ronda Ibex

Ronda Ibex

The smallest type of Spanish Ibex with the smallest horns. Overall color is a light brown. The horns resemble those of an Alpine Ibex, typically growing upward in a V-shape, then backward with a spiral turn of only 90 degrees. Horn thickness is constant for half the length, then decreases gradually to the broomed tips. While this is the typical Ronda horn conformation, other horn shapes may be found in this region and even in the same herd.

Southeastern Spanish Ibex

Southeastern Spanish Ibex

Smaller and lighter in color than Beceite and Gredos types, but larger and darker than Ronda type. Horn size and shape vary considerably from place to place, with those from the Sierra Nevada generally the largest. Horns from Tejada-Almijara tend to be the most distinctive, forming a circle with the tips growing toward the neck like those of a mouflon. The keel is smooth, making the horns almost round in cross-section.

Gredos Ibex

Gredos Ibex

Sometimes called Western Spanish Ibex or Central Plateau Ibex. After Beceite Ibex, Gredos Ibex is the largest and darkest in color and has the largest horns. Typically, the horns are lyre-shaped with a pronounced curve and a spiral turn of more than 180 degrees. Horn thickness decreases progressively from the base to the very thin tip. While this is the typical Gredos horn conformation, other horn shapes may be found in this region and even in the same herd.

Cantabrian Chamois

Cantabrian Chamois

Shoulder height about 28 inches (71 cm). Weight 45-75 pounds (20-34 kg). The smallest chamois, with the lightest coloration. Summer coat is reddish, turning brown in winter. Underparts are pale. Rump, throat, lower jaw and front of face are yellowish. Smaller and paler than Pyrenean chamois and with shorter, slimmer horns.

Pyrenean Chamois

Pyrenean Chamois

Shoulder height 29-30 inches (74-76 cm). Weight 55-90 pounds (25-41 kg). Summer coat is reddish, turning brown in winter. Underparts are pale. Rump, throat, lower jaw and front of face are yellowish. Larger and darker than Cantabrian Chamois, with longer, thicker horns.

Roe Deer

Roe Deer

Roe Deer is Europe’s most common and popular big game animal. A really good Roe Deer head is probably valued as much among Europeans as any other European trophy. Best time to find an outstanding head is during the rut in late July and early August; however, in areas where high crops are grown, early May can be better, because later on the growth is too high for these small Deer to be seen. Best time for a prime cape is June – August. The bucks start to shed their antlers in November. A large caliber is not needed for these small animals, those in the .243 class being just about right. Shoulder height 25-36 inches (64-92 cm). Weight 44-81 pounds (20-37 kg). The smallest and most elegant native Deer in Europe. Coloration is rich reddish-brown in summer, with a gray face, white chin and black muzzle band. Rump patch is obscure. Winter coat is grayish-brown, with two white throat patches and a prominent white rump patch of erectile hairs that can expand under stress to form a large white disk. Tail is small and white, invisible against the rump. Normal antlers of a mature buck consist of a main beam directed upward, with a lower forward tine and a higher rearward tine making three points to a side. (However, non-typical antlers with 4-5 points on a side are not uncommon.) Antlers have a very rough burr (coronet) around the base, and grow so closely together that the coronets usually touch in mature animals. The skull is broad, with a compressed muzzle. The female does not grow antlers, but occasionally will grow coronets without any antler growth.

Hunting territory

Salamanca

Salamanca

It is a lovely region with a gorgeous nature and wildlife. Exclusive hunting rights for over 20 000 acres of the prime hunting land in Salamanca province. The area is located at 2 hours drive from Madrid.

Batuecas National Park

Batuecas National Park

It consists of the Sierra de Francia mountain range located at the southern end of province of Salamanca. It is located about 70 km from Salamanca city, the provincial capital. The Sierra de Francia is one of the mountain ranges belonging to the Sistema Central. Its forested mountain slopes (alder, oak, pine and ash) rise over the Northern Castilian Plateau, marking the geographical limit of its southwestern plains. The Sierra de Francia consists of a quite regular succession of peaks of moderate height, of which the Pico de La Hastiala (5692 feet or 1735 meters) is the highest. The peaks are usually covered with snow in the winter season. Among the rivers that cut valleys in the Sierra, the most famous is the Rio Francia, which gives the mountain chain its name, as well as the Alagon.

Gredos National Park

Gredos National Park

The Sierra de Gredos forms part of the Sistema Central, together with the Sierra de Guadarrama, that cuts across the centre of Spain from the North East of Madrid towards the border of Portugal, running in a Northeast to Southwest direction. The central area of the Sierra de Gredos forms the Parque Regional de la Sierra de Gredos – Gredos Regional Park. The regional park covers some 86 236 hectares.

 

We hunt as well in some of the best private hunting areas in the country.

Hunting

You will be accompanied by the local guide who will help you to select the best trophies in the area. The main way of hunting is stalking.

Deer hunt

Deer hunt

The best time is early in the morning, and late in the afternoon, because during the day the animals rest in thick bush. The transportation around the area is done with the help of 4WD where possible. Normally you will be back for lunch at the lodge, and back to the fields in the evening.

Ibex and Chamois

Ibex and Chamois

Ibex and Chamois: Hunting is a little different as we are talking of mountain hunting. Normally you hunt the whole day and have lunch in the fields. Transportation around the area starts by horse and then you proceed to climb up on foot. Sometimes a stone cabin in the mountains specially fitted for hunters is used for overnight in order to save time and energy for the next day hunt.

Monteria

Monteria

This is an elaborate drive involving many beaters and dogs over prepared ground. This is the classic method, rich with tradition, that is favoured by many Spanish hunters. The area is thick bush, so it makes it very difficult to stalk animals. The hounds are used to drive the game towards the hunters. This is a very spectacular hunt due to the beauty of the countryside, and participation of great numbers of the horses, beaters, hounds and hound keepers.

Route

You will need to arrive to the international airport of Madrid. Many airlines fly to Madrid, including British Airways, Lufthansa, Air France, KLM, Emirates, American Airlines, Delta, etc. After finishing necessary custom formalities you will be transferred to the hunting area.

Accommodation

Great hunting lodges are available for accommodation.
Facilities: Swimming pool, tennis court, clay & live pigeon shooting, target shooting, wine cellar, private lake etc.
Also you can be accommodated in good local hotels near the hunting territory.

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